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'Zimbabweans must resist imperialists' machinations'

by Staff reporter
21 Apr 2021 at 07:09hrs | Views
UGANDA-BASED leader of the Coalition against Coronavirus for Africa Development (ICAC-AD), Tom Isingoma Mwesiga, has challenged Zimbabweans to resist imperialists' moves to influence the country's political and economic developments.

Mwesiga, who recently published a book titled The Pan African Youth, said Zimbabwe's sovereignty should be protected and respected as the southern African country turned 41 on Sunday.

"To be considered an independent country, it means that you fully control your sovereign powers. This means that you have a say as a nation and, therefore, decide in the best interests of your country without interference.

"You have been an independent State and, therefore, keep away from anything that is aimed at putting you in a situation of colonialism that you fought for 15 years to get independent," Mwesiga told NewsDay.

He said he was inspired by the way Zimbabweans loved pan-Africanism.

"No matter the political, religious and tribal differences that may arise, patriotism and nationalism should be bases for you to join hands and build Zimbabwe into prosperity. You have seen how greedy politicians can destroy your nation; you have seen how other nations fall completely to the level of rebuilding. You should be strong to build your country as people loyal to her with a common agenda."

The Zanu-PF government has since last year been pushing for the adoption of a patriotism law, but the proposal is being resisted by opposition parties, civic groups as well as human rights defenders who view it as a ploy to stifle citizens' freedoms.

Mwesiga said Africans should also critically analyse any offer of foreign aid as it might have strings attached.

"I see every African country has been targeted by superpowers and international institutions. They come in with much money claiming to help us develop. We must be wise enough not to fall into the trap of the late 1880s and early 1900s. Those days they came with spoons and beads to the kings to take gold and copper.

"Dear fellow Africans from Zimbabwe, may you distance yourselves from the curse of foreign dependency so that we try to stand against this cancer in Africa," he said.

Source - newsday

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