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Pole dancer inserts beer bottle in her privates, Delta angry

by Staff reporter
09 Jul 2012 at 11:33hrs | Views
Raunchy dancer, Beverly Sibanda and Delta Beverages are on a collision course over the indecent use of beer bottles in her dance routines. Two weeks ago, Bev as Sibanda is fondly known, made headlines with a routine where she seemingly inserted the top part of a quart into her privates.

Last week, George Mutendadzamera, Corporate Director of the beverages concern, urged clients to desist from using bottles for any other use that is not intended.

"It has come to our attention that a small number of our consumers are not properly using our returnable glass bottles," said Mutendadzamera.

"We, therefore, take this opportunity to remind consumers that the empty bottles remain our property and may be used only for the commercial purpose for which they are intended by the company. Accordingly, we urge consumers not use the bottles as containers for products other than our products and not to subject them to any other unauthorised uses."

Bev, however rubbished these concerns saying Delta Beverages was supposed to be grateful that she was marketing their products. A defiant Bev said her fans loved it whenever she took to the stage to perform "the bottle act".

"What use is that bottle (quart)?" she quipped. "There are many forms of bottles that I could use if they stop me. There is Amarula, Viceroy and may others of the same height. I only use their quarts because of their size and nothing else and for the record people love it so much that they actually drink from the same bottles after I use them on stage."

If Bev continues using the bottles, it is possible that Delta could be forced to take legal action, sources said on Friday. Besides hygiene, the company is concerned that the dance routine resembles a sexual act and is therefore inappropriate for its brands.

Those who support Bev said that Delta should not be concerned because their bottles were used in various other ways every day by Zimbabweans and it was unfair to single out the popular dancer.

"That is what the liberation was all about. It is her freedom to express herself that way. The people who created an age restriction in bars also had this in mind. I would not have a problem with her as long as she does it at the right place," a man who identified himself only as Lloyd said.


Source - Zimbabwe Standard

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